News

Musical Notes - Melanie Dawson-Dew

  • Posted on: 6 May 2022
  • By: huw

What is the earliest memory of music in your life? It's almost impossible to isolate one memory but here are a few of the first. At my lovely primary school in Harrow we of course sang hymns at our daily assemblies and I only have to hear Hills of the North Rejoice and I'm back on that stage at Roxbourne Primary School. I was also lucky enough to be one of those children taken to the Ernest Read concerts for children at the Royal Festival Hall on Saturday mornings - how fabulous was that.

Making Music costs Money!

  • Posted on: 6 May 2022
  • By: huw

In September 2021 we were able to return to rehearsals after an enforced break of 18 months and, in November 2021 and March 2022, we mounted two successful performances. Both were enjoyed by choir and audience alike, but the concerts don’t just happen!

In a recent post we highlighted the number of people behind each performance. In this post, Royston Choral Society Treasurer and soprano Caroline Franks looks at the cost of putting on our March concert in Ashwell.

Music as medicine

  • Posted on: 6 May 2022
  • By: huw

Most of us are touched by music – whether as listeners, performers, or both – and many of us in the Royston Choral Society can relate how music helped keep our spirits up through the lockdowns.

A new publication uses this post-lockdown phase in the pandemic to reflect on the value of music for our individual and collective wellbeing, suggesting ways in which it might be more integrated into health care provision.

Musical Memories - Penny Morgan

  • Posted on: 6 May 2022
  • By: huw

Although primarily an instrumentalist, singing has always been a part of my life. One of my earlier recollections is as a nervous 11 year old preparing to sing the opening verse of Once in Royal David’s City for the annual school carol concert in St Johns Church, Digswell, Hertfordshire.

Remembering St Mary's - Neil Heywood

  • Posted on: 9 March 2022
  • By: huw

It will be sixty years ago this September that I went up to London, aged just 18, to become a student at London University. Fresh from the sixth form and a bit adrift in this huge city, I looked for something to do, and as a keen singer at school and in the Hull Bach Choir, I found the University Madrigal Society at a freshers’ evening and went to a couple of meetings.

Growing up in Kenya - John Crosher

  • Posted on: 9 March 2022
  • By: huw

Nearly all my schooling from age 6 to 19 was spent in Kenya, which in those colonial days, and looking back, was a wonderful time. My primary boarding school was near Thomson's Falls (now called Nyahururu and is a tourist attraction) which is in the Laikipia district, close to the edge of the Great Rift Valley. It was partially surrounded by tropical forest, so at break time we went into it and saw colobus monkeys swinging through the trees, and other wildlife.

A dual life - Ian Boughton

  • Posted on: 9 March 2022
  • By: huw

Having just joined the Royston Choral Society to get my vocals back in training, I feel I have come full circle in my musical activities. I was a late developer, only taking a real interest in the passion for singing in my mid 20’s when I began formal lessons with the late Malcolm Singer. I’ve always been interested in stage-work and belonged to two amateur dramatic societies but, despite my heritage of being the youngest grandson of English composer Rutland Boughton (1878-1960) I had no ambition on the music profession and instead joined the Civil Service.

My musical life - Steve Richards

  • Posted on: 9 March 2022
  • By: huw

Thanks to a proactive teaching culture, I was introduced to music at Tannery Drift School in in Royston in 1964 where many pupils took up the recorder. For me, this soon progressed to clarinet and piano. The award of a ‘junior exhibition’ led to free lessons and placements with various Hertfordshire ensembles, including the County Youth Orchestra.

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